Investment Education

So many terms and abbreviations get thrown around in the financial world and it can be overwhelming trying to make sense of it all. As your financial advisor, I'm here to educate you and guide you through this important process. Read more about important financial investing terms and concepts below. As always, I'm happy to meet with you to answer any questions.

Investment Account Types

Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA)


A tax-free savings account (TFSA) is a government-sponsored investment account. Currently you can contribute $5,500 and any gains you make are not taxable. Read more...




Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)


A registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) is an account designed to help Canadians save for retirement. The money in an RRSP can be used to buy a whole host of investments—mutual funds, ETFs, stocks, bonds, and the like. While the investments are held in your RRSP, you won’t have to pay tax on any interest, dividends, or capital gains you earn. Read more...




Spousal Registered Retirement Savings Plan


A spousal registered retirement savings plan (spousal RRSP) is a great way for Canadian couples (married, common law, or same-sex) to invest equivalent amounts for retirement — even if there’s a major disparity between what each person makes. Read more...




Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP)


A registered education savings plan (RESP) is an investment account designed to help you save for a child's education. RESPs can be used to pay for your child's college or any post-secondary education. They are government-regulated accounts and offer tax-free investment growth. Read more...




Registered Retirement Income Fund (RRIF)


A registered retirement income fund (RRIF) is a retirement savings account designed to grow your money even after you retire. It’s essentially a basket of investments—you can choose from GICs, mutual funds, ETFs, or stocks and bonds—that earns money during your retirement. Read more...




Locked-In Retirement Account (LIRA)


Locked-In Retirement Account (LIRA) is a rolled-over retirement account. A LIRA allows you to roll over money from a pension account after you leave your job. Read more...




Joint Account


A joint account is a bank account or brokerage account opened by more than one owner. Married couples often have joint accounts, as do business partners, as well as aging parents who need their adult children to handle their finances. Read more... Typically, married couples open joint bank accounts for the ease of handling finances, including paying bills, from a single account. Plus, in the unfortunate instance that one of the account holders dies or becomes incapacitated, the other account owner has full legal access. Without a joint account, getting access to a deceased spouse's account can be more difficult. However, you want to make sure that you have full trust in the person you open an account with. While it makes it easier for handling finances, if your co-owner is irresponsible or your relationship sours, he or she could withdraw some or all of your shared money. It's also important to note that when you open a joint account you also take on responsibility for any debt. Financial institutions can cease funds in your joint account to pay for debt that your co-owner may have. Additionally, if there are overdrafts on the account, it affects both of your credit scores. I can help advise you on the benefits of a joint account and if it's right for you. Schedule an appointment with me today to look at your particular financial situation.




Individual Pension Plan (IPP)






Insurance Types

Life Insurance


Life insurance provides protection for your family in the unfortunate event of loss. There are 2 main types of life insurance -- term and permanent. Term life insurance lasts for a specific period of time such as 10, 20, or 30 years. It's a great option to provide security while you have a young family. For most of my clients with young families and mortgages, I typically recommend purchasing a term life insurance policy to help protect your family and your assets. Permanent life insurance is just what it sounds -- indefinite unless you cancel it. When you die, a tax-free death benefit is paid to the beneficiary. If you have many assets that your beneficiaries will need to pay taxes on upon your death, permanent life insurance can help cover those tax expenses. Permanent life insurance is typically much more expensive than term life insurance. As your financial coach, I can help you identify if there are other investment opportunities to explore before purchasing permanent life insurance. However, for some clients, I recommend permanent insurance as an investment. Through permanent insurance you're able to build up a cash value that, if structured correctly, will have tax-exempt growth (similar to an RRSP or TFSA).




Health & Dental Insurance


While Alberta Health covers your basic healthcare needs (i.e. doctor appointments, emergency room visits, etc), it does not cover items like dental care, eyeglasses, or prescription drugs. Some employers provide this insurance coverage to their employees, but if you're self-employed, unemployed, or underinsured, visits to the dentist, ophthalmologist and pharmacy can add up quickly without insurance. I can help you select an insurance plan that can save you and your family money.




Travel Insurance


From minor hiccups to major roadblocks, travel insurance can give you peace of mind. It can help cover things like lost or delayed luggage, medical emergencies, last minute cancelled trips or even delays in your trip. Typically the cost is just a small percentage of your overall trip cost.




Critical Illness Insurance


Critical Illness Insurance is one of those products that you hope you never need to actually use, but are relieved to have it in the instance you do have to use it. Essentially it pays you a lump sum of money if you are diagnosed with any of the specified illnesses.




Disability Insurance


Again, this is one of those insurance types that you hope you'll never have to use, but are very relieved to have it if you do need to use it. While critical illness insurance provides a single payment upon diagnosis of select illnesses, disability insurance provides monthly payments for a set amount of time if you are unable to work due to an injury or illness. There are two types of disability insurance: short-term and long-term and differ in the amount of time they cover. Of course, each policy has specific details that can be discussed with me during your free consultation.




Long-Term Care Insurance


When dealing with an illness, there are often costs that creep up that aren't covered by public healthcare. Long-term care can help cover things like assisted living, respite care, a specially equipped nursing home, home modifications to accommodate a disability, etc.




Group Benefits


Do you own a business and want to provide insurance coverage as a benefit to your employees? Doing so can be a great incentive during the hiring process to help you get top-tiered employees plus it can help keep your employees healthier so they can perform better. Group benefit plans typically provide insurance coverage at a more affordable rate than individual plans. I can help you select the right group benefit plan for your company.




Segregated Funds


A segregated fund is a product offered through insurance companies that gives you access to public market investments with the protection of insurance — it can add some more security to your investment portfolio. These funds guarantee 75% - 100% of your principle upon maturity of fund or your death.

Seg Funds can have higher fees than a traditional mutual fund, but many seg funds providers have series that are very competitive with similar mutual funds. Seg funds also allow the benefit of creditor protection. The assets inside of your segregated fund may be protected from creditors if you have a named beneficiary. They also may be protected in the event of a lawsuit against you.

As your segregated fund increases in value, you have the option to “lock in” those gains with resets. If your investment grows you can lock in at the new value which become your new guaranteed amount. Also note that with most segregated funds this also resets the maturity
guarantee date.

Segregated funds can also be very useful in estate planning. If your seg fund has a named beneficiary, the funds will pass on directly to them without going through your estate. Your asset will not be subject to the taxes or fees that are associated with settling the estate. It
also means that they will receive the funds faster since they are paid out within a few weeks whereas estates can sometimes take months or even years before they are settled.





Public Market Investments

Exchange-Traded Fund (ETF)


An exchange-traded fund (ETF) is a type of diversified investment fund. This fund lets you buy a large mixture of individual stocks or bonds in one purchase. It's similar to a mutual fund, but unlike the actively managed mutual fund, it has much lower fees. Typically mutual funds charge a 1% annual fee. ETFs usually church less than half that -- between 0.05% and 0.25%. The rise of online investment platforms has enabled anyone to invest even as little a dollar in ETFs. Why are index ETFs so inexpensive? Because you’re not paying a fund manager to pick winners in the stock or bond markets, or to make large numbers of expensive trades, or even respond to ups and downs in the market. Instead, index ETFs select an entire category of securities and invests in it broadly — by investing this way you’re said to be “tracking” a particular market. This is called passive investing. There are lots of different types of ETFs — some invest in the companies of the S&P 500, some in real estate, some in a particular country’s stock market – but they all more-or-less work the same way. Historically, funds that track major stock indices, for example the S&P 500, have performed better than many actively managed investments.




What is the Public Market?


Public Investments hold stocks or bonds of Publicly Traded Companies.
A Publicly Traded Company issues stocks or bonds. A stock is equity or ownership in the company whereas a bond is debt or fixed income for the company. You, the bond holder, are essentially loaning the company money. Both stocks and bonds can be traded on the open or public market. The public market is sometimes referred to as a secondary market since you can buy or sell your stocks or bonds with others daily if you desire. In comparison, private market investments have no secondary market to trade your investment (see private market investments). Public market investments are said
to be liquid as you can get cash for them very quickly. That being said, you may not always get the price you want for those investments at the time you need it. Many people invest in the public markets through pooled funds so that they are able to own portions of many different companies often with very little upfront money needed. There are many different types of public investments but the most common are mutual funds, segregated funds and exchange-traded funds (or ETFs).




Segregated Fund


A segregated fund is a product offered through insurance companies that gives you access to public market investments with the protection of insurance — it can add some more security to your investment portfolio. These funds guarantee 75% - 100% of your principle upon maturity of fund or your death.

Seg Funds can have higher fees than a traditional mutual fund, but many seg funds providers have series that are very competitive with similar mutual funds. Seg funds also allow the benefit of creditor protection. The assets inside of your segregated fund may be protected from creditors if you have a named beneficiary. They also may be protected in the event of a lawsuit against you.

As your segregated fund increases in value, you have the option to “lock in” those gains with resets. If your investment grows you can lock in at the new value which become your new guaranteed amount. Also note that with most segregated funds this also resets the maturity
guarantee date.

Segregated funds can also be very useful in estate planning. If your seg fund has a named beneficiary, the funds will pass on directly to them without going through your estate. Your asset will not be subject to the taxes or fees that are associated with settling the estate. It
also means that they will receive the funds faster since they are paid out within a few weeks whereas estates can sometimes take months or even years before they are settled.




Mutual Fund


A mutual fund is a product that allows investors to pool their money together in a fund that is managed by a qualified investment manager and firm. Unlike buying shares from one another on a stock market, mutual fund shares are bought directly from the fund company which then purchases shares for the investors.

Mutual funds give you the ability to buy many different securities without having to invest extremely large amounts of money to do so. They also give you the ability to have professionally managed money. With actively managed funds, the decisions to buy or sell are made by a portfolio manager or managers supported by researchers.

At the end of the day the value or price of the mutual fund is determined by the total value of the securities in the portfolio divided by the number of shares in the fund. This value is know as its net asset value or NAV.
Note: I am not licensed to sell mutual funds. The information here is provided to help educate you on the world of investments.





Private Market Investments

Private Market Investments





Who can invest in Private Investments?


Eligible Investors: Net worth over $400,000 or individual income over $75,000 or combined with spouse $125,000* OR Accredited Investors: Financial assets over $1 Million or individual income over $200,000 or combined with spouse $300,000* *Income consistent for the previous 2 years with the expectation it will remain or increase. Refer to the OMC exemption for full details on eligibility.




Examples of Private Market Investments


Private Investments come in a variety of products. Below are some examples. Please note that not all products may be available at a specific time. Please contact me to learn more about current products available. -Self Storage -Healthcare -Tax Strategies -Private Debt -Multi-Unit Real Estate -Industrial Real Estate -Senior Living Facilities -Biotechnology Technology -Energy Financing and Leasing -Cannabis -Private Equity -Manufacturing